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By NEW YORK DENTAL STUDIO
April 25, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canals  

Root Canals can be essential to oral health care. Some people think they are painful, but that's just a myth. Root canals actually relieve root canalpain. Modern technology has come a long way, allowing your Midtown Manhattan, NY, dentist, Dr. Brandon Huang, of New York Dental Studio to treat your tooth pain.

People need a root canal when a cavity is deep enough to infiltrate the enamel and dentin, reaching the pulp, causing pain. Your Midtown Manhattan New York dentist will need to remove the pulp, clean and disinfect the canal from any bacteria remaining, then seal the canal to prevent any more bacteria from entering.

A tooth consists of four layers. The outermost layer is enamel. It's the white part of the tooth and also happens to be the strongest part. The second layer, under the enamel, is called dentin. This layer is a yellow, softer layer. The third layer of the tooth is called pulp. It consists of blood vessels and nerves. The last layer is the cementum. It anchors the whole tooth to the jawbone.

One of the main reasons people end up needing a root canal is because of poor oral hygiene. If you don't brush your teeth twice a day and floss at least once, then you will suffer from plaque and tartar building up. Plaque and tartar are not only difficult to clean at some point, but you have to deal with bacteria eating away at your teeth.

  • Brushing at least twice a day and flossing once before bed, at the very least
  • Eating sugary foods and drinks, like gum and soda, contribute to tooth decay, but healthy foods like apples and carrots help scrape plaque off teeth
  • Drinking water also removes plaque and food debris from your teeth

If you have any questions or concerns about root canals, don't hesitate to call your dentist Dr. Huang of New York Dental Studio in Midtown Manhattan, NY. You can also schedule an appointment at this number: (212) 588-1809.

SteelyDanFoundersDeathHighlightsImportanceofEarlyCancerDetection

Fans of the legendary rock band Steely Dan received some sad news a few months ago: Co-founder Walter Becker died unexpectedly at the age of 67. The cause of his death was an aggressive form of esophageal cancer. This disease, which is related to oral cancer, may not get as much attention as some others. Yet Becker's name is the latest addition to the list of well-known people whose lives it has cut short—including actor Humphrey Bogart, writer Christopher Hitchens, and TV personality Richard Dawson.

As its name implies, esophageal cancer affects the esophagus: the long, hollow tube that joins the throat to the stomach. Solid and liquid foods taken into the mouth pass through this tube on their way through the digestive system. Worldwide, it is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths.

Like oral cancer, esophageal cancer generally does not produce obvious symptoms in its early stages. As a result, by the time these diseases are discovered, both types of cancer are most often in their later stages, and often prove difficult to treat successfully. Another similarity is that dentists can play an important role in oral and esophageal cancer detection.

Many people see dentists more often than any other health care professionals—at recommended twice-yearly checkups, for example. During routine examinations, we check the mouth, tongue, neck and throat for possible signs of oral cancer. These may include lumps, swellings, discolorations, and other abnormalities—which, fortunately, are most often harmless. Other symptoms, including persistent coughing or hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, and unexplained weight loss, are common to both oral and esophageal cancer. Chest pain, worsening heartburn or indigestion and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can also alert us to the possibility of esophageal cancer.

Cancer may be a scary subject—but early detection and treatment can offer many people the best possible outcome.┬áIf you have questions about oral or esophageal cancer, call our office or schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Cancer.”

By New York Dental Studio
April 10, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
GettingDentalImplantsRequiresMinorSurgery

Dental implants are best known as restorations for single missing teeth. But there’s more to them than that—they can also be used to support and secure removable dentures or fixed bridges.

That’s because a dental implant is actually a root replacement. A threaded titanium post is inserted directly into the jawbone where, over time, bone cells grow and adhere to it. This accumulated bone growth gives the implant its signature durability and contributes to its long-term success rate (95%-plus after ten years). It can support a single attached crown, or serve as an attachment point for a dental bridge or a connector for a removable denture.

The method and design of implants differentiates it from other restoration options. And there’s one other difference—implants require a minor surgical procedure to insert them into the jawbone.

While this might give you pause, implant surgery is no more complicated than a surgical tooth extraction. In most cases we can perform the procedure using local anesthesia (you’ll be awake the entire time) coupled with sedatives (if you have bouts of anxiety) to help you relax.

We first access the bone through small incisions in the gums and then create a small channel or hole in it. A surgical guide that fits over the teeth may be used to help pinpoint the exact location for the implant.

We then use a drilling sequence to progressively increase the size of the channel until it matches the implant size and shape. We’re then ready to insert the implant, which we remove at this time from its sterile packaging. We may then take a few x-rays to ensure the implant is in the right position, followed by closing the gums with sutures.

There may be a little discomfort for that day, but most patients can manage it with over-the-counter pain relievers like aspirin or ibuprofen. It’s what goes on over the next few weeks that’s of prime importance as the bone grows and adheres to the implant. Once they’re fully integrated, we’re ready to move to the next step of affixing your crown, bridge or denture to gain what you’ve waited so long for—your new implant-supported smile.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Surgery: What to Expect Before, During and After.”

By NEW YORK DENTAL STUDIO
April 09, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Root Canal  

It’s important that you don’t ignore these classic warning signs.root canal

Sure, we know that the last thing you want to face is dental problems, but sadly they can happen to anyone. Isn’t it better that you have a dentist in Midtown Manhattan, NY, like our very own Dr. Brandon Huang that you can turn to when you start noticing changes or symptoms that are disconcerting and troublesome? We think so!

Unfortunately one of the most commonly performed dental treatments—root canal therapy—gets a bad rap; however, it could just end up saving your tooth from needing to be extracted. Find out the common warning signs that you may need to get root canal treatment.

What is root canal therapy?

The purpose of this procedure is to treat and preserve as much of a tooth after an infection, decay, or trauma as possible. When an infection or decay breaks through the hard outer layers of the tooth (known as the enamel and dentin layers) it can infect or damage the dental pulp, a fleshy mass made up of connective tissue, blood vessels, and nerves.

Once the pulp has been infected or inflamed the only option is for our Midtown Manhattan general dentist to remove the pulp before the infection or damage continues to spread. This procedure is performed right here in our office under local anesthesia so you won’t feel a thing.

What are the signs that I need a root canal?

It’s important to note that not everyone will experience symptoms, which is why you should continue to visit your dentist for routine checkups every six months no matter what’s going on. You may not even realize that you are dealing with decay, gum disease, or an infection until you come in for a checkup and the sooner we catch a dental problem the better.

However, sometimes an infected dental pulp can cause issues for the sufferer. These are classic signs that you might need a root canal:

  • Dental pain (the pain may get worse when chewing or biting down on the tooth)
  • Lingering tooth sensitivity to hot or cold
  • Sudden darkening of a tooth
  • Tender or sore gums around the tooth
  • A pimple-like growth on the gums near the affected tooth

If you are experiencing any of these issues above then it’s important that you immediately call New York Dental Studio, located in Midtown Manhattan, NY. We will make sure that you receive the care you deserve so you are smiling again in no time.

By New York Dental Studio
March 26, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
WeCanRidYouofThatIrritatingLumpinYourMouthYouKeepBiting

You might not be aware how much force your jaws generate while you eat or chew. But you can become aware in a hurry when part of your inside cheek or lip gets in the way.

What may be even worse than the initial painful bite are the high odds you’ll bite the same spot again—and again. That’s because of a feature in the skin’s healing process.

As a surface wound heals, it often forms a cover of fibrous tissue consisting of the protein collagen. This traumatic fibroma, as it’s called, is similar to a protective callous that develops on other areas of damaged skin. In the process, though, it can become “taller” than the surrounding skin surface, which increases the chances of another bite.

This second bite often results in more fibrous tissue formation that rises even higher from the skin surface, which then becomes more likely to be bit again. After repeated cycles, the initial wound can become a noticeable, protruding lump.

These kinds of sores are typically not cancerous, especially if they’ve appeared to form slowly over time. But they can be a nuisance and the occasion of sharp pain with every subsequent bite. There is, though, an effective way to deal with it—simply have it removed.

While it involves a surgical procedure—an oral surgeon, periodontist or dentist with surgical training usually performs it—it’s fairly minor. After numbing the area with a local anesthetic, the dentist will then completely excise the lesion and close the resulting gap in the skin with two or three small sutures (it could also be removed with a laser). The wound should heal within a few days leaving you with a flat, flush skin surface.

The tissue removed is usually then biopsied. Although it’s highly unlikely it was more than an annoying sore, it’s still common procedure to examine excised tissues for cancer cells. If there appears to be an abnormality, your dentist will then see you to take the next step in your treatment.

More than likely, though, what you experienced was a fibroma. And with it now a thing of the past, you can chew with confidence knowing it won’t be there to get in the way.

If you would like more information on dealing with common mouth sores, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor article “Common Lumps and Bumps in the Mouth.”





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